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Posts tagged “The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing Bees

A beehive in Harvard Square – and perhaps one for your home?

Just across the street from Hotel Veritas is a thriving, happy beehive – which happens to be in the most incredible little shop called Follow The Honey.  Actually, they call themselves a “story” rather than a “shop.”

“Follow The Honey is not just a store, it’s a honeybee-centric STORY [an adventure!] illuminating the landscape, wildlife and humanity from whence its nectar flow originates. To this noble mission, Follow The Honey travels the world bringing the finest of “transparency of source” honeys and bee-inspired offerings to you and your sweet ones. In addition to raw untreated honeys, we offer solar power created aromatherapy beeswax candles, mead kits, honey filled truffles from local chocolatiers, holiday cards, silk hexy-sexy scarves, Apis melliferous bling, books of Melissae both scholarly & esoteric,  propolis tinctures, pure pollen, with honey infused lotions, soaps, scrubs & salves. We even carry Iggy’s bread on weekends to slather your honey on with an organic local cheese to pair ~ we are your all purpose sweet gifting honeypot in Harvard Square!”

Helping tell the story of Follow The Honey and bees is Noah Wilson-Rich, Ph.D., Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Best Bees Company. Based in Boston, MA, they specialize in installing honey bee hives in densely populated, urban areas – offering their services to the Greater Boston area and Cape Cod.  Noah was recently interviewed by CNN for a segment on The Mysterious Case of the Disappearing Bees and wrote a very interesting article for cnn.com.  He writes, “Honey bees are dying. This is a global phenomenon and a worldwide problem affecting food availability. Like climate change, the decline of honey bees is not unprecedented. There were great die offs of honey bees reported as early as the year 950 A.D. in Ireland, called the “Great Mortality of Bees”. This repeated in Ireland is 992 and 1443. The great die-off crossed the pond in 1903 when 2,000 colonies died in Cache Valley, Utah. Three years later, 100% of hives died on the Isle of Wight, UK. And then, in 1996 and again in 2006, Pennsylvania beekeepers reported alarming numbers of honey bee die offs. These die-offs are continuing today, but under the auspice of a new name, Colony Collapse Disorder.”

We’re fascinated by the story of Follow The Honey – and of the disappearing bees.  And now we’re ready to enjoy some honey.

Follow The Honey, 1132 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138

 

 

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